Nora Fried, Physical Oceanographer

Hi everyone!

Picture 1: Poster presentation at Ocean Sciences in San Diego 2020
Image credits: Femke de Jong

My name is Nora Fried and I’m a third year PhD student at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research. I did my Bachelor “Physics of the Earth System” and my Master “Climate Physics: Meteorology and Physical Oceanography” at GEOMAR in Germany. This was also where I joined my first research cruises. My highlight so far was probably the chance to join the PAMARCMIP campaign to northern Greenland in 2018 during the last year of my Masters. An experience I will never forget.

I think my journey starts at the age of 10 when I joined a science project in primary school. I’m still grateful for my teachers during all those years in high school who supported my way into science and helped me getting prepared for university. At the end of my Bachelor I got the chance to join a research cruise on the RV Meteor to the tropics and a year later one on the RV Maria S. Merian to the subpolar North Atlantic. I remember that after this cruise my best friend said: “Do you remember that this has always been your dream to join an expedition on a boat and to see ice bergs?”. I’m glad she made me remember that by that time I had already reached one of my biggest dreams.

So, after years of studying I am very proud to call myself a physical oceanographer. I’m glad that I found a PhD project that suits me so well and gives me the opportunity to join cruises on a regular basis. Cruises are still one of my favorite parts in science. Most of my colleagues think that I work with models because I’m sitting in front of a computer most of the time. But as a sea going oceanographer I mostly work with observational data. 

Nora working on a research vessel
Picture 2: CTD work on board RV Pelagia in summer 2020
Image credit: Elodie Duyck

For my PhD project I’m studying a current in the North Atlantic which is a continuation of the warm and saline Gulf Stream. Observations in the ocean are still rare which makes a time series in remote places like the subpolar North Atlantic very valuable. Currents in the ocean are important for all of us as they impact the weather and climate. We use so-called ‘moorings’. They look like a necklace hanging upright in the water column with instruments attached to it, measuring temperature, salinity and velocity. With those observations we hope to get more insight into how the current is changing over time, and whether changes are an effect of climate variability or if they can be linked to climate change.

The pandemic made me realize that there are so many things more important than work. Friends and family who we as scientists don’t really see very often as we change location often in our career. I’m glad that I now have opportunity again to follow my hobbies: Singing and wheel gymnastics (or Rhönrad). During lockdown I went for long walks which helped my head calm down after a day of work.

Nora working on a research vessel in yellow rain gear and an orange helmet
Picture 3: Cleaning instruments after recovery on board RV Pelagia 2020
Image credit: Elodie Duyck

My advice for the new generation in science is: Ask for help. Science is a tough environment and I wish it would be less competitive. So, I encourage everyone to ask for help when they are stuck. Being stuck is normal in science and asking for help should become more normal, too. And to make clear what I mean with being stuck. I’m talking about being stuck science wise when you need someone to bring a new perspective into your work. But not less important I’m talking about being mentally stuck. Work-Life-Balance in science is hard as we all feel emotionally involved in our work. Ask for help early enough, science is not the only thing life has to offer.

Follow Nora’s updates by following her @fried_nora or https://norafried.de/

Neurodiverse Perspectives in Paleontology: An example of collaborative museum exhibit design and self-advocacy, crafted for and by neurodiverse people

Please welcome guest bloggers, Taormina (Tara) and Katrina Lepore. Tara, a paleontologist, writes about the work she and her sister did to develop an exhibit for neurodiverse folks at Katrina’s life skills workplace. 

My sister and I have always been different. What does ‘being different’ mean, in a big world with endless types of people? Sometimes, our differences are really apparent; other times, they’re much more subtle. Identifying as members of both the disabled and neurodiverse communities brings an awareness to how difference is ‘embodied’ in our societies. And, we think, the perspective that difference can bring makes for better science, and a better world all around. Disabled and neurodiverse people aren’t always under the spotlight in science, but my sister and I decided to work together and make our own museum space with the perspective and ingenuity of these communities.

We began this project in summer 2020, and collaborated with my sister, Katrina’s, life skills workplace, Communitas, Inc. in Woburn, Massachusetts. I’m also affiliated with the University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP) at UC Berkeley. Several of Katrina’s coworkers and colleagues participated in a hands-on paleontology day, with the opportunity to make plaster fossil molds, construct a model T. rex skeleton, and identify fossil trading cards with their definitions. The highlight of our paleontology day was the creation of a small fossil museum exhibit in a lobby jewelry case, where all visitors and employees could experience an exhibit crafted with neurodiverse perspectives. It was so fun and a valuable experience to work together on what works, and what doesn’t work, in museum exhibit design for disabled and/or neurodiverse people.

Some of the things we implemented included touchable fossil items, large print labels, and fossil organization by time period and by environment (ocean vs. land, etc.). We also created some augmented reality (AR) prompts where visitors could hold up their phone to a fossil in a specific app, Adobe Aero. The Aero app would recognize the fossil and pop up with a video narrating what the label said, as a way of providing accessibility to non-readers or non-verbal people. The exhibit designers shared that some of the things that are helpful at museums include touchable objects, quiet spaces to interact with exhibits, and more than one way of interacting — for example, videos plus text panels. Things that were challenging for the designers included loud and busy museum spaces, being unable to read or interact with the text panels, and the brightness of the overhead lights in some museum spaces. After the summer museum exhibit design project was completed, Katrina sat down for an interview on the design process and how her experience with museum paleontology felt.

A few online paleontology events also happened over the next year or so, and in summer 2021 we had another in-person paleontology day, focusing on touch tables and bringing museum topics to the same cohort of museum exhibit designers from summer 2020. We’re planning on presenting some of this collaborative work together at a symposium for community connections to natural history collections, this upcoming summer! It’s our hope that my sister and I can continue to learn about paleontology together, and inspire other life skills workplaces and museums to collaborate in including neurodiverse and disabled perspectives in exhibit design.

Alyssa Anderson, Geologist

Tell us a little bit about yourself. My name is Alyssa Anderson, and I am an undergraduate student at the University of South Florida studying for a Geology and Environmental Policy B.S. I was born in New Jersey, but since Florida’s been my home since I was four years old, I consider myself more a Floridian. Outside of science, I enjoy world-building, writing, sewing, and reading. I think that’s part of why I enjoy geology so much, because I love creating worlds and making them geologically and scientifically accurate! But not completely, because I am a big fan of fantasy and fiction novels, so a little magic is fun, too. 

A white woman with short dark hair stands in front of a stream filled with large, flat rocks, smiling up at the camera. She is dressed for hiking and stands in the stream on a sunny day.
Figure 1: Hiking through the mountains in North Carolina, overjoyed at finding a stream filled with wonderful rocks.

What kind of scientist are you and what do you do? My path as a scientist leads me towards geology and the environment. Some of my major interests are hydrology and oceanography, but I am also very interested in other roles such as GIS and policy work. I am also beginning an internship managing climate change and climate data in some Florida counties, which fits in with my goal of being an environmental scientist.

What is your favorite part about being a scientist, and how did you get interested in science? My favorite part about being a scientist is the discovery. I love learning and being able to apply the knowledge I’ve learned into real-world applications is gratifying. I could study most any science field and be as happy as a clam because there is always something new for me to discover. 

A group of students pose near some rocks, two girls and a guy. The girl in the middle is white with short dark hair. The field surrounding the rocks is wide and open, with mountains in the distance.
Figure 2: On a geology field trip with some Mineralogy and Petrology friends, near part of the Appalachian Trail in Virginia. I am the dashing figure in blue posing by the rocks.

How does your work contribute to the betterment of society in general? My work in my current internship will benefit the Florida county I am assisting with, as it strives to understand and manage climate change impacts. It also gets students and staff involved in their local environment and brainstorming ways on how to solve some of the major environmental issues of our generation, i.e., climate change. Plus, it encourages more students to get into science and policy and I believe having a science background in a policy related field is extremely important for more well-informed laws and regulations.

What advice do you have for up and coming scientists? My advice for new scientists is this: spending some of your free time on hobbies you enjoy is a good thing. Sinking all of your effort and energy into studying without breaks will lead to burnouts and breakdowns. So, please, do take your time and don’t think that more work will lead to more results if you aren’t resting in between!

Ohav Harris, Undergraduate Geology Student

Ohav sitting in gravel in a museum exhibit under a T. rex.
Me with Stan the Tyrannosaurus rex at my internship at the Wyoming Dinosaur Center.

Tell us a little bit about yourself. Outside of science I enjoy reading manga, collecting Pokémon cards, and playing video games.

Describe what you do. I am an undergraduate researcher. I recently finished a project which involved entering geographic information of echinoderms (animals like and including sea stars, sea lilies, sea cucumbers, etc.) into a database so that we could analyze their biogeographic patterns (how the animals moved through time and space) in the geologic record.

I have done class visits with groups of fourth graders as a part of the Scientists in Every Florida School program to teach them about geology.

Discuss your path into science. I used to want to be a lawyer for as long as I can remember, but on my 17th birthday, I visited the American Museum of Natural History and was smitten with their dinosaur exhibits! After leaving, I was unsure if I wanted to continue pursuing a career in law, so I did some basic research of how much I could expect to make as a paleontologist (to make sure I could still support myself and a family) and decided to commit to the switch. After that, I have been pursuing dinosaur paleontology as best I can!

A dinosaur skull in rock with the sclerotic ring highlighted in purple.
The sclerotic ring (highlighted in blue) is a bony structure found in the eye of some dinosaurs and all modern-day birds. I am very interested in studying what those rings did for dinosaur eyes and how they developed. (source: ecomorph.wordpress.com)

Discuss other scientific interests. I’m very interested in birds and reptiles, specifically snakes. If I couldn’t study nonavian (non-bird) dinosaurs, I would study one of those groups of animals in the fossil record. I’ve also become quite attached to crinoids since starting my undergraduate degree, so they would be my invertebrate pick!

How does your work contribute to the betterment of society in general? Hopefully, with the echinoderm geographic data that I’ve collected, we can better understand of echinoderm evolution through time as well as how they dispersed across the world over time. 

I hope that I’ve convinced the classes I’ve visited that geology is a science that rocks! More than that, I also hope that I’ve made them more curious about how our world works, and to keep asking amazing questions and finding equally amazing answers.

Fossil sea lilies embedded in rock.
A crinoid fossil. I have been researching the geographic distribution of these ancient sea lilies and other echinoderms, like sea stars, and I thought this was a very nice fossil to show how neat they are! (source: fossilera.com)

Is there anything you wish you had known before going into science? Mainly, what classes I would have to take. In my case, I had multiple major options, but didn’t look too far into them. I’m very happy where I am now, although I’m sure there is an alternate universe version of me that is going down the biology route. 

Have you received a piece of advice from your friends/mentors/advisors that has helped you navigate your career? I’ve gotten good advice about grad school. In particular, I should be reaching out to professors I would like to work with a good while before applications are due.

Echinoderm Morphological Disparity

Echinoderm Morphological Disparity: Methods, Patterns, and Possibilities

Bradley Deline

Summarized by Whitney Lapic,  a Time Scavengers collaborator and graduate student in paleontology. Whitney studies the paleoecology of extinct echinoderms including blastozoans. Outside of research and class time, Whitney is with her cat, Quartz, and can be found tending to her numerous houseplants. 

This paper serves as a review of different approaches for and the importance of studying morphological disparity, or varying expressions of physical characteristics across a group of organisms. Since the 1960s, the importance of examining morphological disparity among organisms has become increasingly apparent. Early studies observed disparity at varying taxonomic ranks (e.g., the diversity in a phylum, like Mollusca, the group including snails and clams) while others applied numerical approaches to quantify morphological disparity. Regardless of a quantitative or a taxon–based approach, there is a need for developing some metric to quantify disparity.  

What data were used?: While this article does not collect new data, it synthesizes a collection of studies done on echinoderm disparity. Echinoderms, the group including sea stars and sea urchins, offer an opportunity as a model organism for studying morphological disparity. Echinoderms are highly skeletonized and can be abundant and well preserved in the fossil record. Additionally, they present a wide variety of morphologies and are both ecologically and taxonomically diverse. While studying disparity among echinoderm morphologies has significantly helped address some gaps in our knowledge, studying disparity still offers opportunities to explore echinoderm evolution. 

Methods: This study reports multiple methodologies and discusses them in depth with their applications, benefits, and caveats. These methodologies include morphometric approaches using landmark-based geometric morphometrics, as well as discrete character-based approaches. Landmark based morphometrics involves the identification of easily recognizable features, such as the point of contact between two plates that can be measured across individual organisms. Landmark based approaches can assist in differentiating species, studying the growth of a species throughout its ontogeny (growth and development), and can help in studying the disparity of a group through time. 

Alternatively, character-based methods are often used when fossils are too damaged to do landmark analysis. When continuous measurements of characters cannot be obtained, the expression of a character is divided into categories into which individuals may be placed. This approach presents as a coded matrix in which expressions of a morphological feature would be coded as, for example, 0, 1, 2, etc. as a means of using discrete categories. Realistically, a combination of the two are used in these types of studies. We want to utilize as many approaches as possible. When we obtain comparable results using multiple methods, this is vital in our understanding of and interpretation of potential evolutionary trends. 

The variable morphologies and the differences among them can help us explore the morphospace of echinoderms. Morphospace is a graphical representation of all forms of physical characteristics that a particular group can present with. Understanding the morphospace of taxa, and specific regions of a taxon’s morphospace can provide insight into its resiliency and susceptibility to extinction and diversification. For example, we can consider the variable morphologies of echinoderms and how very different morphologies can assist in their survival in different environments. 

A figure with a black background and white text has high resolution, black and white photos of six echinoderms labelled A through F with their respective scale bars. In the first of two rows, starting on the left: specimen A) an oblong, non-radial form of echinoderm next to a scale bar of 1mm. The outer plates of the echinoderm are large, and rectangular while the inside is comprised of smaller plates. To the right, B) a misshapen, circular edrioasteroid with apparent 2-1-2 symmetry seen in the ambulacra. Plates of many sizes can be seen around the ambulacra which form almost a star shape. The scale bar for this specimen is on the bottom left and reads 5 mm. Specimen C) shows a circular, mobile echinoid. The echinoid is crushed, but may show some short spines. Scale bar is located on the bottom left and reads 5 mm. On the second row, from left to right: D) a branching, stalked, crinoid with the calyx, or central part of the body, oriented downward. Scale bar is 5mm. E) a relatively circular diploporitan echinoderm. Five slightly curved ambulacra can be visible. Scale bar is 5 mm. On the bottom right, specimen F) a stalked eocrinoid. The stem is oriented downward with the theca, or body, showing a complex series of circular structures. From the theca, there are five arms extending from the top of the theca and outward. The scale bar is 5 mm and is at the bottom left of the image.
Figure 1: Six echinoderms from the early Paleozoic. The six specimens show a range of body plans that can be found among Cambrian and Ordovician echinoderms. Figure from Deline et al., 2020. A) Ctenocystis showing the non-radial form of a ctenocystoid. B) Edrioaster, an attached pentaradial edrioasteroid. C) The mobile echinoid, Bramidechinus. D) Anomalocrinus, a pentradial stalked crinoid. E) Gomphocystites, a pentaradial stalked diploporitan. F) Sineocrinus, a pentaradial stalked eocrinoid. Image from Deline et al. (2020).

Why is this study important?: This paper addresses the ways in which echinoderm morphologies and their disparity can be used to further investigate echinoderm evolution. There has been a rich history of utilizing disparity and morphological approaches to study echinoderm evolution, however, there are several opportunities for further study. This paper highlights the need for combining both phylogenetic study and morphologies to gain further insight into evolutionary processes, both those including, and beyond, echinoderms.

The big picture: Understanding disparity is critical to our interpretations of trends in evolution, as well as to the development of methods to test hypotheses regarding the relationship between disparity and extinction events. By quantifying variation in morphologies, we are able to both provide a metric for understanding the degree of change in morphology during the evolution of a lineage and to explore selection towards particular morphologies surrounding extinction events.

References: 

Deline, B. (2021). Echinoderm Morphological Disparity: Methods, Patterns, and Possibilities. Elements of Paleontology, Cambridge.

Deline, B., Thompson, J. R., Smith, N. S., Zamora, S., Rahman, I. A., Sheffield, S. L., Ausich, W. I., Kammer, T. W., Sumrall, C. D. (2020). Evolution and Development at the Origin of a Phylum. Current Biology, 30, 1672-1679.

Combining our past life with our present improves the foundation and deeper understanding of our evolutionary tree

Fossils improve phylogenetic analyses of morphological characters

Nicolás Mongiardino, Russel J Garwood, Luke A. Perry.                                                         

Summarized by Sadira Jenarine, a senior at The University of South Florida. She is a geology major and plans on attending graduate school following graduation in the summer. Once she earns her degree, she hopes to work along the lines of environmental conservation and preservation or become a professor. When she’s not looking at rocks, you can usually find her at the local Starbucks making a latte or in the town’s own “Lettuce Lake Conservation Park”.     

What data were used: The authors conducted a simulation of 250 evolutionary trees, also called phylogenies, which were used to determine the most accurate method of creating phylogenetic trees. Programs were designed to account for species’ traits, including strengths and weaknesses as well as their ability and likeliness to survive natural disaster, such as mass extinction events, and/or predation.     

Methods: This study was completed by testing different phylogenetic inference methods: maximum parsimony (MP), Bayesian inference (BI) and tip-dating. MP is essentially the path of least resistance in evolution; the fewer branches you must jump on “the tree of life”, the more closely related a species likely is. Bayesian inference, combined with tip-dating is a method of dating fossils by analysis that gives a numerical age of the specimen, and then tests whether it is statistically accurate using an equation called Bayes Theorem. These methods differ from a more common technique, ‘node dating’ which determines the age through age constraints that are formed by the first and last seen specimen in the fossil record. These new forms of analysis were tested based on the 250 trees as well as over 11,000 different traits that these organisms share. 

Results: This experiment was conducted by testing the results of the length of the simulated evolutionary trees. The graph (Figure 1) measures the accuracy of the placement of the species on the tree among all inference methods performed by testing different accuracy measures, which are measured by using the number of nodes (i.e., the branching point on an evolutionary tree). We see that even with accounting for missing data (i.e., when species don’t have the entire suite of characters used in a phylogenetic analysis), one type of accuracy, quartet-based accuracy, increases proportional to the fossil sample. In turn, bipartition-based accuracy shows a difference in accuracy when there is missing data. This effect is mostly seen when examining tip-dated inference which uses multiple morphological (body shape) and molecular (DNA) data from fossils themselves. Tip-dating is a newer method of inference and should therefore be used with caution, as it is sensitive to missing data, something very common when using fossils. 

Graph in top left measures the topological accuracy of bipartitions based on the proportion of missing fossils in maximum parsimony (MP), Bayesian inference (BI) and tip-dating (clock). No missing data concludes a higher accuracy in all 3 inferences with the most outstanding in clock dating. Even amongst high levels of missing data, the topological accuracy for clock dating is outstanding in comparison to other methods. The bottom left graph measures the same variables however with quartet-based analysis. This graph remains the same even with different levels of missing data. The graphs to the right measures the topological precision. In MP precision decreases as more levels of missing data are introduced, same with BI and clock, however not as outstanding. In quartet-based analysis all three inference methods maintain similar precision even amongst missing data.
Figure 1. The graph shows both topological accuracy (left) and topological precision (right) using both forms of measurement; bipartitions (top) and quartet (bottom). Colors indicated in the graph account for the levels of missing data. Amongst all methods, we see increased accuracy than that of parsimony. Issues arise with the tip-dating (clock) method when levels of missing data are high.

Why is this study important? Using complete morphological and/or molecular data of fossils, as well as data from living organisms, provides the most accurate evolutionary tree reconstruction. This shows us that tip-dating, which is the inclusion of fossils into the construction of the evolutionary tree, creates a more accurate and precise tree. This study compares its results to those from previous analyses and examines a new angle: accounting for missing data. This is beneficial, because this study helps us understand the limitations of a number of methods, which can help us create more realistic phylogenies. 

The big picture: Here, we are learning that using fossils along with modern species, when many studies use just modern species or just fossil species, really gives us a more accurate representation of how life on Earth has evolved through time. Because some of these methods of inference are newer, like tip-dating, there is much room for progress and development. By no means does it mean that new methods should be immediately widely accepted, but that it is our duty to continue to study this new form of inference dating. By understanding how what we have, what we had, and what we lost, we can get a better grasp of the evolutionary tree that we are working to perfect.   

Citation: Mongiardino Koch, Nicolás, et al. “Fossils Improve Phylogenetic Analyses of Morphological Characters.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 288, no. 1950, 2021, https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2021.0044. 

Kaleb Smallwood, Undergraduate Geology Student

A 20-year old African American male (me) wearing a blue beanie, black shirt and wristband, a watch, headphones, and a turtle necklace looking down at his turtle with dark green and yellow stripes.Tell us a bit about yourself. Hello, my name is Kaleb Smallwood, and I am an undergraduate geology student at the University of South Florida. My main geological interest is in paleobiology, but I am also interested in sedimentology, volcanic processes, and igneous rocks and processes within the field. Outside of academics, I enjoy role-playing games, both table-top games and video games, with a few favorites being Dungeons and Dragons and Persona 4. I play other types of both forms of game, but RPGs are by far my favorite genre with which to pass the time. On top of my love for video and table-top games, I am a massive anime fan. So, in summary, I am a gargantuan nerd.

What kind of scientist are you, what do you do, and how will it benefit society? As I mentioned previously, my focus in college is on paleobiology, and while I am not yet a fully-fledged scientist, my goal is to enter the field conducting research on dinosaurs and paleoecology after I obtain my PhD. Ecology is the study of the interactions of both biotic and abiotic factors with their individual ecosystems, and paleoecology simply focuses on ancient organisms. I hope to perform research on dinosaur paleoecology, studying their interactions with the environment to better understand their modes of life. In so doing, I plan to draw links between the ways in which these ancient animals lived and how modern analogs survive. In the process, I will be providing scientists and the public with a better idea of how dinosaurs lived, and, by extension, how modern animals live. Paleontology plays a crucial and often overlooked role in our knowledge, as understanding the past helps us better comprehend the present and predict future trends. For example, knowing how climate change affected the world and how it proceeded in the past allows us to understand what a large issue it is today and how it will impact our ecosystems. By the same token, understanding ancient ecological interactions has implications for current ones. Knowing how an apex predator such as Tyrannosaurus rex interacted with its environment, prey, and the carrying capacity of its ecosystem helps us understand how modern apex predators do the same today, for example.

An African American male (me) smiling at the camera. His face fills most of the image, and he wears a blue beanie and red shirt.How did you get interested in science? I have always had an interest in science, likely because I aspired to be like the odd and often socially awkward geniuses portrayed on television and in books in my youth. However, my interest in geology and paleontology specifically began in very simple ways. I have collected rocks since starting elementary school and identifying the rocks in my collection (which was very easy since I only ever picked up sandstone, quartz crystals, and limestone) brought me extreme joy. It felt like a unique form of science that only I could do, since I was the only weirdo in my classes interested in objects like rocks. As for paleontology, I was hooked the moment I read my first book about dinosaurs in 3rd grade. Seeing the pictures and reading about the interesting and distinct ways in which these animals of wildly ranging sizes went about their lives was enthralling, and that childlike whimsy never truly faded away. 

What advice do you have for up and coming scientists? My advice, especially for scientists coming from minority racial groups, is to believe in your own capabilities and understand your own worth without needing acknowledgement from others. While praise is always nice, alternatively, sometimes people will immediately assume you to be inferior just by how you look. Challenge those biased expectations indirectly through your own brilliance and show that you are just as capable as those around you if not more so. Finally, remember that if you were truly inferior, you would not be in the position you are in.

Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM): a potential foresight into the future of ocean life

Shallow marine ecosystem collapse and recovery during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

Skye Yunshu Tian, Moriaki Yasuhara, Huai-Hsuan M. Huang, Fabien L. Condamine, Marci Robinson

Summarized by Mathew Burgos, University of South Florida undergraduate geology student. Interested fields of study include solar radiation, hydrology, hydrogeology, hydroelectricity, geochemistry, and environmental sustainability.

What data were used? Rich fossil records of ostracod arthropods (the group that also includes spiders, trilobites, and insects), extracted from a Salisbury embayment (i.e., a recessed coastal body where there is a direct connection to a larger body of water) near the coast of Maryland, eastern United States. Ostracods inhabit nearly all aquatic environments on earth; their tiny shells make them look like “seed shrimp”, and they were among the only marine invertebrate fossils with a strong enough fossil record to reconstruct the group’s response to the PETM (Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum), a time on Earth where the global temperatures skyrocketed for a geologically short period of time. A core sample was utilized to study the ostracods; a core is a cylindrical section of the Earth where the sediments, rocks, and organisms within are removed from the subsurface for analyzation. 

Methods: A sediment core was dug from the ground in the embayment, and the ostracod content within the core was analyzed for carbon-13 isotope values, to later determine the survival rate of the species during and post-PETM. Studying fossil records of creatures that existed during that time may lead to future impacts on marine life and our oceans future health. Carbon-13 isotopes can indicate periods or events of warmer temperatures when the values trend negatively, so the isotope values here helped identify the stages of the PETM alongside the fossils. The PETM (Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) is an event that occurred roughly 56 million years ago, and it was a climatic event similar to the current global warming crisis because of prolonged greenhouse climate conditions; however, the current crisis is happening at a much faster rate.

Four panel image with differences described in caption. Each panel represents a time slice to show the changes in environment that is tracked by marine species.
Top left, Pre-PETM setting: regular oceanic conditions for marine life above the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ).
Top right, During peak PETM: shallow marine migrating upslope for survival. Deep low oxygen species also moving upslope and separating from their fellow deep marine species that are adapted to low oxygen.
Bottom left, Recovery phase I: Species that survived the PETM returning to pre-event locale above OMZ.
Bottom Right, Recovery phase II: Mixing of potentially new warm adapted species and shallow marine species.

Results: Analysis of the ostracod abundance illustrated a substantial elimination of the shrimp just before the thermal maximum event, followed by a recovery and diversification of the species once the ocean temperature normalized a couple of million years later. Potential detriments of the thermal maximum are the irreversible impact that climate change had on the marine life, primarily due increased temperature and deoxygenation of the water. As deoxygenation spread (Figure 1), only species who were able to move into different areas of the water column were able to survive; those who could not went extinct. Some species nearly went extinct during the PETM but were able to recover and diversify after the event, even potentially returning to a healthy population. 

Why is this study important? This study made connections between the PETM and modern climate change that is human-driven, which is extremely harmful to marine life, as the PETM is likely the best analog to the current climate crisis. Effects of modern-day climate change are like the happenings of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. This is an indicator of the importance of the impact humans could possibly have on the ocean in a short period of time, relative to the Paleocene and Eocene Epochs.

The big picture: The recent global warming effects that humans have had on could prove to be detrimental to our existence. This study focuses on the PETM that occurred over a vastly longer time scale compared to the short duration of the current age of industrialization. Humans are essentially replicating an extreme thermal event, that would otherwise be relatively naturally occurring in Earth’s time, but at a rate which is exponentially smaller in timeframe. With the status of the Earth’s oceans warming, we could potentially see the ramifications of eliminated marine species within our time at an unprecedented rate.

Citation: S.Y. Tian, M. Yasuhara, H.-H.M. Huang, et al., Shallow marine ecosystem collapse and recovery during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, Global and Planetary Change (2018), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloplacha.2021.103649

Benjamin’s 2021 American Geophysical Union Experience

This year’s AGU Fall meeting rotated to New Orleans, probably the most unique of any of the cities that AGU takes place in. We were met at the airport by a band organised by the meeting, and took the bus to mid city where I stayed. When I left Montreal there was a couple of inches of snow on the ground which was quickly turning to ice, but I did not want to bring my coat along and was ready for the respite of mid twenty degrees before I had even left, and indeed some months before. I registered at the conference centre, 1 hour’s walk at the same pace as the charming trams down Canal Street, and looked around the halls and grabbed a spare mask. It was strange to see some people at the conference not wearing one. It was chilly inside and I was glad I had brought a jumper. 

Benjamin in the foreground with a band playing in the background at the airport.
Greeted at the airport by a band

I attended a nice mix of talks and was glad that my oral presentation was in the middle of the week so it was not looming over me the entire time as it had in the past. However it was at 8 am on Wednesday morning and I wondered about the turn out for a mid-week early morning session. AGU is a long week with late nights and a lot of walking and talking. The room was small and had about 25 people in it. I think that conferences are still trying out different formats of presentations and I was surprised to find out that the format was a set of 5-minute overview followed by a free for all of questions, although being able to ask questions online is advantageous as more people can participate. I thought that everyone would have watched the 15-minute longer presentations but I’m not sure that everyone had, and I received one question. It felt a little disheartening but I think poster sessions are better for questions and feedback, and I brought some printouts of my data to discuss and refer to at the poster all in a kind of mini-poster session. The overview talks in my session were very interesting, and it was a hybrid session so there were both in-person and zoom overview talks given. 

New Orleans street that Benjamin walked on the commute to the conference venue. Street is lined with vehicles and shows row houses.
Views on my hours commute to the conference centre

Because of covid it seemed less social or less easy to approach people, and it was also difficult to tell who was who and to get close enough to read name badges and still politely maintain 2 metres distance. In the past the lanyard colour indicated which broader grouping of sessions you were part of, but this year indicated what level of comfort the participant had with social distancing. I find that conferences are always quite solitary and involve trekking back and forth to different interesting talks, looking for somebody to connect with. This year I signed up to host a queer networking pod in the poster hall after my talk. I rushed there to find a whole group of people, more than had been in attendance at my session, chatting and getting to know one another. There was a pod from 9.30-10.30 am each day and I think it is a great way of starting each conference day having had a chance to connect with someone new, as well as colleagues from previous years. This is especially nice and welcoming for first-time attendees, and I overheard people sharing advice and tips about navigating such a large conference, and telling each other about networking events that they had not heard about. One of these events was the ACQ Networking Meet-up on the Thursday evening where the organisers had managed to secure funding to cover refreshments for all of the attendees. They did a wonderful job organising it even though double the number of people anticipated turned up. This was a chance to get to know people a bit better than during the quick zipping around at the convention centre. AGU has different official networking events that you can sign up for but others are word of mouth. In the past I heard about ACQ by chance but this year it was part of the official program, and was advertised on Twitter, so the turn out was excellent. I met a lot of people and promised to visit them at their poster sessions. I learnt a lot, made links with my own research, and met many new people. It was a pleasure to be able to visit New Orleans, a beautiful city full of history and of life, and I also met many local people outside of the conference. My impression is that people are happy that people are visiting, and businesses are happy to have conferences like AGU take place, but there is also a sense of anger about gentrification taking place in the city.  I am very glad to have been able to visit and experience the conference and New Orleans, and returned to Montréal feeling very satisfied. 

Park in New Orleans with a focus on a water management system to mitigate flooding
Water management projects in parks

 

Below are some links to read more about gentrification in New Orleans:

 

An Important Look Back on the Unjust Past of Paleontology

Our past creates our present: a brief overview of racism and colonialism in Western paleontology

Summarized by Kaleb Smallwood, a junior undergraduate geology student at the University of South Florida who intends to use his degree to pursue a career in vertebrate paleontology. Outside of geology, his interests include video games, anime, and mythology.

Rather than a traditional scientific study using data and presenting results, here the authors attempt to unravel the racism, coverings, exclusion, and colonialism of paleontology’s past in order to better understand the racism present in the sciences today and how best to go about rooting this bias out. 

Since the inception of the discipline, paleontologists have extracted fossils, minerals, and fossil fuels from other lands, often without regard to the Indigenous peoples or otherwise residing there. This results in environmental destruction and displacement, as the scars left by this extraction tear up land and plants, leaving holes where digs occurred. On the topic of environmental devastation, the history of paleontology is also inextricably linked to the oil, coal, and gas industries. Paleontologists have served these industries in the location and extraction of nonrenewable resources in exchange for funding, job security, and support since they began to better understand how and where oil forms, implicating them in climate change. Another form of extraction exercised by paleontologists is that of biological specimens, both living and dead. For example, the several species of the finches (Figure 1) Darwin studied and extracted on his voyage on the HMS Beagle, such as the saffron-cowled blackbird and vampire finch, were pulled from their habitat and sent to Europe. Paleontologists have also participated in grave robbing, removing the remains of Native Americans and Black slaves to examine their cranial structures in an effort to further their racist views that these peoples are more closely related to primates than white people. Many of these remains of people are still held in storage and studied. While the loss of biodiversity from an ecosystem is a grave consequence of extraction of animals, the removal of humans from their lands is also an egregious crime of paleontologists. It is a flagrant act of disrespect to the culture and lives of the people from which they are taken. 

There is also the issue of the Myanmar amber trade, from which paleontologists have gained amber for examination in exchange for money that has been used to fund a decades-long civil war resulting in numerous deaths. Measures to limit and prohibit the publication and procurement of such amber have been put in place, but not all are ubiquitously accepted. Scientists are strictly forbidden, however, from publishing on Myanmar amber obtained after the most recent coup in February 2021.

Depicted are three type specimens of birds from Darwin’s voyage on the HMS Beagle. They appear as mockingbirds with light brown feathers on their underside and darker brown and white feathers on the wings. They are ordered by increasing size, with the smallest at the top of the image and the largest at the bottom. The eyes of the birds are missing, and they have tags tied around their feet displaying their taxonomic names. From top to bottom they are labeled as Orpheus parvulus, Orpheus melanotis, and Orpheus trifasciatus.
Figure 1. Specimens of birds from Darwin’s voyage on the HMS Beagle. From top to bottom they are labeled as Orpheus parvulus, Orpheus melanotis, and Orpheus trifasciatus. Image Credit: “Voyage of HMS Beagle (1831-1836).” Natural History Museum, Natural History Museum.

Returning to the topic of museums, scientists often take materials from other countries and peoples for the purpose of education and exhibition without asking, and this colonial way of obtaining their exhibits is cited as a cause for concern. Museums often refuse to acknowledge the methods by which they procure their items, do not credit the places they got them from, refuse to compensate these countries or return their property, have disproportionate wealth and resources compared to other museums, lack diversity in their staff, and pay their staff little for their work. Accountability, inclusion of the voices of the people whose history they display, and a willingness to return items would go a long way in correcting these flaws.

There are also injustices present in the teaching of paleontology. As the authors point out, textbooks and courses in the Americas tend to omit the ways in which scientists in the field have previously trampled upon Black and Native American people. For example, the erasure of their history and the fact that the first known fossils in the Americas were discovered by slaves is rarely mentioned. As is apparent, science has never been the unbiased and apolitical field students are led to believe it is. Furthermore, these courses are often taught by white men, further excluding other racial groups. The power system this creates makes it difficult for those with concerns to voice them for fear of reproach.

Why is this important/The big picture: Underscoring each point in this article is the constant reminder that the challenging task of acknowledging and reflecting on the past and current racially discriminatory of paleontology, the geosciences, and science as a whole, is a crucial first step in resolving those same issues. The writers call on paleontologists to consider whether the specimens they use come from Indigenous lands and ask who truly owns their specimens; they ask paleontologists to consider the people that their research may impact and their role in it, as giving proper credit to the right people without bias or exclusion is a crucial practice in any field, not just the sciences.

Monarrez, P., Zimmt, J., Clement, A., Gearty, W., Jacisin, J., Jenkins, K., . . . Thompson, C. (2021). Our past creates our present: A brief overview of racism and colonialism in Western paleontology. Paleobiology, 1-13. doi:10.1017/pab.2021.28